Equus Review Video

 

Equus runs two more weekends, 4/18, 4/19 and 4/25, 4/26.

Purchase your tickets here.

Equus receives rave review!

The reviews are in. Equus is a hit! Read what the Vindicator has to say about this raw, edgy show.

10169169_10152320437848363_808838013995589478_nBuy your tickets now,  right here on The Oakland’s webpage, or get them at the box office the night of the show. Only four performances left, this Friday and Saturday night and April 25, 26.

Click here to purchase tickets.

Equus, By Peter Shaffer

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The Oakland Center for the Arts is proud to present EQUUS, a play by Peter Shaffer written in 1973, telling the story of a psychiatrist who attempts to treat a young man who has a pathological religious fascination with horses.

Shaffer was inspired to write Equus when he heard of a crime involving a 17-year-old who blinded six horses in a small town near Suffolk. He set out to construct a fictional account of what might have caused the incident, without knowing any of the details of the crime. The play’s action is something of a detective story, involving the attempts of the child psychiatrist, Dr. Martin Dysart, to understand the cause of the boy’s actions while wrestling with his own sense of purpose. The stage show ran in London between 1973 and 1975: later came the Broadway productions that starred Anthony Hopkins as Dysart (later played by Richard Burton and Anthony Perkins), and from the London production, Peter Firth as Alan. The Broadway production ran for 1,209 performances.

Peter Shaffer’s Equus

Directed by Vaughn Schmidt

Cast:

Dr. Martin Dysart- Timothy Thomas
Alan Strang- Cheney Morgan
Frank Strang- Eric Kibler
Dora Strang- Molly Galano
Hesther Salomon- Joanna Andrei
Jill Mason- Jane Jones (Kylie Davis)
Harry Dalton- Alan McCreary
Young Horseman/Nugget- Dan Lancy
Horses- Nathan M Tustin, Tayler Diana

Click here to purchase tickets

Pink! by Stacy Davidowitz

Ah, the joys of sleep-away camp: cabin raids, color war, and a slavish devotion to social hierarchy. For the girls of Bunk 14, camp isn’t an eight-week vacation; it’s a dog-eat-dog microcosm of the adult world they’re desperate to inhabit.

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Played out in real-time over the course of one summer night, PINK!’s breakneck-paced thrill ride deep into the unexpectedly dark and dangerous world of twelve year-old girls is as hysterically funny as it is brutally disturbing. Take note: animals in their natural habitat can be extremely dangerous. Pink! crosses a line into the horror, honesty, and painful glory that is pubescence. For those of you who’ve forgotten what it’s like to be a tween, hold on tight. It’s fun, but it’s not always pretty.

Pink! by Stacy Davidowitz will premiere on The Oakland stage in 2014! Check back soon for audition, cast & crew updates.

bare The Musical

main-logoA contemporary rock musical, Bare follows a group of teens wrestling with issues of identity, sexuality, and religion at a co-ed Catholic boarding school. Provocative, raw, and unyielding in its exploration of how today’s generation navigates the tightrope between adolescence and adulthood, Bare examines the consequences of baring a soul-or hiding it from those who matter most.

Bare book by Jon Hartmere, Jr. and Damon Intrabartolo, lyrics by Hartmere and music by Intrabartolo.

Bare will premiere on The Oakland stage July 18-27, 2014. Stay tuned for audition announcements and cast & crew updates.

For more information about the show, click here.

Suave and the Boner – Steampunk Cabaret

oakland suaveSuave and the Boner

November 8, 9, 8:00 p.m.

Lizzy Suave and Jack Boner are Suave and the Boner! All riled up from their sold-out NYC cabaret shows, this November, The Oakland gets a show with Steampunk style, cabaret chops, and an evening of vaudeville-style musical comedy that drags the double entendre to new depths of entertainment for nonstop laughs. Suave and the Boner is a fundraiser to benefit the Oakland Center for the Arts.

Angels in America: Millennium Approaches by Tony Kushner


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October 4-19 (7pm curtain)

Please Note that this production is for mature audiences only and has a curtain time of 7:00 p.m. for all performances.

Written by Tony Kushner

Directed by Matthew Mazuroski

For our 2013-2014 season opener, we are proud to stage the local premiere of this Pulitzer and Tony award-winning play.

Set in 1985 in the midst of New York City’s AIDS crisis, Angels in America Part 1: The Millennium Approaches follows the overlapping plots of Roy Cohn, lawyer and powerbroker, Joe and Harper Pitt, and Prior Walter and his partner Louis Ironson. As the play progresses, Prior, who is infected with the AIDS virus, gets sicker and he begins to hear a mystical voice while the rest of the characters are struggling against their personal demons.

The cast includes James McClellan, Bernie Appugliese, Tyler Clark, Johnny Pecano, Candy DiLullo, Liz Conrad, Timothy Thomas,  and Molly Galano.

2013-2014 Open House

Join us on September 13th for free food by Avalon Downtown, live music from Red Brick Rhoades, the grand opening of our 2nd Floor Living Room, a comedy performance by Fat Neil Comedy, poetry slams, and previews of our upcoming productions of ANGELS IN AMERICA, EQUUS, PINK, BARE, and CLOSET SPACE! Free admission!

HAIR at the Oakland Center for the Arts!

Hair poster finalBook and lyrics by James Rado and Gerome Ragni; Music by Galt MacDermot
Directed by John Holt
July 26 – August 10, 2013

On July 26, the Oakland Center for the Arts premieres HAIR.  Written by James Rado and Gerome Ragni, with music by Galt MacDermot, the American Tribal Love Rock Musical first hit Broadway in 1968 and was controversial for what many considered to be anti-American sentiments. However, HAIR is as pro-American an artistic work as anyone will find, then and now. A 21st century audience will connect with the still resonating themes: poverty, environmental destruction, racism, and the psychological effects of war, to name a few.

John Holt directs the production and says “HAIR has been on my directing bucket list for a long time. The story remains relevant, and the music is simply incredible. It’s music theatre at its best and a director’s dream.” HAIR marks Holt’s directorial debut at the Oakland and his return to the Youngstown theatre scene. He said, “Oh, I got really excited when I checked out the space. It’s intimate but not too small.  The audience is going to be right there with our tribe, and we’re going to make the place explode with sound. I’m just thrilled to be working again with some of my favorite people in the world, Matt White on the music end, Ellen Licitra on lights, Leslie Brown on set design, and Dorene White will stage manage. This show is a challenge across the board so you want the best at what they do, and we have them.”

Holt held auditions five months before beginning rehearsals for HAIR in order to gather some of the area’s strongest talent. Additionally, diversity in the tribe was of paramount importance in order to reflect the message of unity that is at the heart of HAIR. In the Oakland production, the audience will see a tribe whose members differ in race, ethnicity, age, body type, and sexual identity. Holt said, “It’s about bringing people together and creating relationships. HAIR will prove to be fun, and it should be fun, but it also needs to be provoking and moving.”

Matt White, who recently worked on Spring Awakening, is handling the music for HAIR, which includes coaching the actors on vocals as well as leading a live band that will play onstage during the show. HAIR is about music, so integrating the musicians into the action, rather than having them offstage and out of sight, brings about the blending of music and movement.

Joey Pascarella is cast as Claude, the young hippie and nominal leader of the tribe whose story is at the center of HAIR. Jason Green returns to the Oakland stage as Claude’s best friend, the “psychedelic teddy bear” George Berger. Lauren Wenick plays NYU student turned political activist Sheila, and recent YSU theater graduate, Jessica Schmidt is the pregnant, gas mask wearing Jeanie. Nikita Jones as Ronny starts the show off with her roof-rattling rendition of “Aquarius,” one of the most well known numbers from HAIR. The musical features more than 30 songs including favorites “Let the Sunshine In,” “Easy,” and the title track “Hair.”

Many local actors bring their talents to the tribe: Rosie Jo Neddy, Susan Prosser, Jimmy Rosan, Haggy Hageman, Dylan White, Medford Mashburn, Kate Starling, Amy Banks, Dan McClurkin, Victoria Lubonovich, Larissa Woloszyn, Kristopher Ray North, Jacinda Madison, Anthony Madison, and Adrienne Viano.

In recognition of its commitment to the community and in honoring its value of creating work that amplifies current issues and that promotes social justice, the Oakland will hold a benefit performance of HAIR when a portion of the proceeds will go to the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center’s Youngstown Outpatient Facility on Belmont Avenue. The Stokes facility provides a range of care for veterans including primary medical care, outreach to homeless veterans, pharmacy, social work, extended rehabilitation, and mental health. Oakland Center for the Arts President Cleric Costes says, “We believe that community theatre should, at all times, strive to serve its community. We couldn’t think of a better organization to benefit from a production of HAIR than one that provides our veterans with the support they need.”

HAIR runs Friday and Saturday evenings at 8:00 from July 26-August 10. For more information or to order tickets, click the “GET TICKETS” tab, call the theatre at (330) 746-0404 during our box office hours (Wednesday and Thursdays 4:30pm-6pm), visit our Facebook page, or visit our new ticket re-sale partner, Joe Maxx Coffee Company at 47 Federal Plaza, in downtown Youngstown.

 

The Children’s Hour

On May 10, the Oakland Center for the Arts opens the classic drama The Children’s Hour. Written by Lillian Hellman in 1934, this chilling story of how a young girl’s vindictive manipulations can ruin lives will resonate with today’s audiences. Cleric Costes will direct the Oakland production, assisted by Kristopher Ray North. Stephanie Sarrach is stage manager.

The Children’s Hour takes a close look into the world of a Massachusetts farm turned girls’ school where gossip, blackmail, jealousy, lies, and bullying lead to dire consequences when two teachers are accused of having a sexual affair. Because any mention of homosexuality was illegal on a New York Stage at the time Hellman wrote The Children’s Hour, the story is told through subtle dialogue and implication, which adds to its dark intrigue.

To capture these themes, Costes chose to use a minimalistic set done entirely in black and gray tones and sparsely furnished. The cast is costumed in black, white, and gray, making this Hellman classic into an updated mood piece. Costes said, “stripping away all the usual theatrical trappings and shifting the play from a realistic approach to a Brechtian style enlightens the internal motivations of the characters. It also pushes the audience to narrow its focus on the actors’ actions and reactions. Nothing gets missed. ”

Mary M. James and Victoria Lubonovich take on the lead roles of the accused teachers, Martha Dobie and Karen Wright. Dana Dunnavant plays the loving but imposing Mrs. Tilford, and Miranda Canacci portrays her scheming and vengeful grandaughter, Mary. Leigh Cox, Brandon Smith, Tricia Terlesky round out the adult roles in the cast. The girls include Chloe Housteau, Madison Gulfo, Hannah Nitzsky, Jansen Hykes, Selena Phillips, Sierra Smith, and Elsie Kibler.